Our panel of 91 professional philosophers has responded to

5
 questions about 
Euthanasia
58
 questions about 
Abortion
208
 questions about 
Science
117
 questions about 
Children
374
 questions about 
Logic
39
 questions about 
Race
96
 questions about 
Time
221
 questions about 
Value
1280
 questions about 
Ethics
134
 questions about 
Love
88
 questions about 
Physics
51
 questions about 
War
110
 questions about 
Biology
2
 questions about 
Culture
77
 questions about 
Emotion
43
 questions about 
Color
32
 questions about 
Sport
80
 questions about 
Death
27
 questions about 
Gender
69
 questions about 
Business
31
 questions about 
Space
75
 questions about 
Perception
218
 questions about 
Education
287
 questions about 
Language
81
 questions about 
Identity
24
 questions about 
Suicide
23
 questions about 
History
574
 questions about 
Philosophy
54
 questions about 
Medicine
36
 questions about 
Literature
124
 questions about 
Profession
154
 questions about 
Sex
70
 questions about 
Truth
75
 questions about 
Beauty
151
 questions about 
Existence
170
 questions about 
Freedom
2
 questions about 
Action
89
 questions about 
Law
282
 questions about 
Knowledge
34
 questions about 
Music
244
 questions about 
Justice
284
 questions about 
Mind
4
 questions about 
Economics
67
 questions about 
Feminism
105
 questions about 
Art
68
 questions about 
Happiness
392
 questions about 
Religion
58
 questions about 
Punishment
110
 questions about 
Animals

Question of the Day

I've come to the conclusion that you may be confusing "has their own opinion" with "has their own truth."

2 plus two is 4, whether someone believes it's 5 or not. If they believe that it's 5, this is their (very confused) belief, but what in the world do we gain by saying that it's their truth? If you talk that way, you blur the useful distinction between being right and being wrong.

It gets worse. If I take you seriously, then I could respond by saying "well it may be your truth that everybody has their own truth, but it's my truth that they don't. And so if you want me to take you seriously, you've given me a perfect reason not to take you seriously.

Of course people have different beliefs. We usually take that to be a matter of people disagreeing. But if you and I genuinely disagree, and aren't just play-acting or using words for fun, we can't both be right. And if either or both of us is wrong, then at least one of us doesn't have the truth of the matter; we have a mistaken belief about the subject of our disagreement.

Now you might ask: who has the right to say who's right or wrong? But that's the wrong question. The world doesn't give a darn what I think about it. The world is the way it is whether I or anyone else know what that way is. Reality isn't up to us. It seems to please some people to think otherwise, but it pleases some people to pick the anchovies off their pizza; there's no accounting for tastes.

In asking the questions you've asked, you presuppose that there are correct answers. Otherwise, why bother? Why not just come to a belief and call it your truth? Asking a question seriously doesn't fit with thinking that "everyone has their own truth." Asking questions seriously supposes that there are answers, and that it's possible to get those answers wrong. Most of the time, that's what most of us think. It's hard to see why we should think otherwise.