It has recently struck me that despite my interest in both physics (as a

It has recently struck me that despite my interest in both physics (as a

It has recently struck me that despite my interest in both physics (as a qualified physicist) and philosophy (as a complete amateur), I have not encountered any philosophy regarding the 'origin' of the universe or indeed aspects of the Cosmos as a whole. While metaphysics is increasingly dealing with questions and dilemmas in modern theoretical physics, I have not seen anyone address the question of *why* the Universe/Cosmos exists. I raise this point purely from a metaphysical standpoint. (The religious aspect is irrelevant.) I am curious whether most philosophers would even think it is a valid question to ask *why* the Universe exists. That is, why not nothing? (I do not mean the Universe is a limited physical sense, as part of a great "Multiverse" perhaps, bus as the all-encompassing everything.) If it does not sound too strange: why does nothing not exist? The temporal problems that some consider; for example the "beginning" and "end" of time do not particularly bother me as a scientist, since time is but another (asymmetrical) dimension, that may well have raised from symmetry-breaking or need not exist at all for a generic Universe to exist. In any case, if this question is considered valid (by some at least), has anyone addressed it? It strikes me as somewhat difficult to reason or even conjecture about the (non-)existence/possibility of nothingness, though perhaps I am missing something. I would be most interested in hearing any thoughts philosophers here or indeed in the great world have on this subject.

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