Research in anthropology and related disciplines reveals that there is no strong

Research in anthropology and related disciplines reveals that there is no strong

Research in anthropology and related disciplines reveals that there is no strong evidence of any universal morals; there are no set of moral beliefs that are found uniformly across all existing countries or cultures. This has often been interpreted to mean that morality is unrelated to the existence of a deity. Some, however, believe that while the lack of universal morals is true it does seem that there is a universal sense of “oughtness”, or a universal tendency to justify what we do, or to place value judgments like “right” and “wrong” on behavior. From a philosophical perspective is this universal tendency toward morality better explained by a need to “get along” to increase fitness in our world (roughly a sociobiological explanation of morality), or is it perhaps better explained by our possessing an intrinsically moral nature, i.e. one that may exist because of the existence of a deity or deities (or even because life may continue after physical death without the existence of a deity). Sociobiology, if true, surely can provide sufficient grounds for the existence of morals; but I wonder whether this is a plausible and coherent explanation (e.g. where, for example, does the force or authority of morals come from?).

Read another response by Peter S. Fosl
Read another response about Biology, Ethics