Our panel of 91 professional philosophers has responded to

75
 questions about 
Beauty
43
 questions about 
Color
243
 questions about 
Justice
87
 questions about 
Law
1
 questions about 
math
124
 questions about 
Profession
23
 questions about 
History
77
 questions about 
Emotion
75
 questions about 
Perception
370
 questions about 
Logic
58
 questions about 
Abortion
5
 questions about 
Euthanasia
34
 questions about 
Music
107
 questions about 
Animals
58
 questions about 
Punishment
392
 questions about 
Religion
24
 questions about 
Suicide
221
 questions about 
Value
39
 questions about 
Race
81
 questions about 
Identity
32
 questions about 
Sport
79
 questions about 
Death
1273
 questions about 
Ethics
169
 questions about 
Freedom
208
 questions about 
Science
69
 questions about 
Business
54
 questions about 
Medicine
2
 questions about 
Action
96
 questions about 
Time
36
 questions about 
Literature
153
 questions about 
Sex
31
 questions about 
Space
88
 questions about 
Physics
110
 questions about 
Biology
218
 questions about 
Education
68
 questions about 
Happiness
151
 questions about 
Existence
116
 questions about 
Children
51
 questions about 
War
105
 questions about 
Art
283
 questions about 
Knowledge
284
 questions about 
Mind
573
 questions about 
Philosophy
4
 questions about 
Economics
70
 questions about 
Truth
27
 questions about 
Gender
285
 questions about 
Language
2
 questions about 
Culture
133
 questions about 
Love
67
 questions about 
Feminism

Question of the Day

With matters of etiquette, such as which hand to use for the fork, or matters of personal preference, such as which wrist to use for one's watch, I don't think "Why?" questions are intellectually substantial enough to be worth asking more than once or twice. But philosophical and scientific questions are intellectually much more substantial, much deeper. There it makes excellent sense to keep asking "Why?" questions for as long as those questions remain well-posed. You're right that we don't want a loop -- a circle -- of "Why?" questions, because in that case a question reappears after it has already been adequately answered. But a loop is different from a regress of questions, which may be finitely long or indefinitely long. On whether an indefinitely long regress is always something to avoid, see this SEP entry.