One can say something mixing words from two languages (say, English and

One can say something mixing words from two languages (say, English and

One can say something mixing words from two languages (say, English and Ukrainian), and make good, clear and exact sense. One can even mix parts of words, or structures, and make perfect sense. My problem is that such an invented sentence wouldn't be meaningful according to any one of the "previously existing" languages. But, since it has linguistic meaning, it seems that it should have meaning according to some language. What language is that? The "sum" (what is that?) of the two used languages? The sum of all the existing languages in the world (since we can mix words from whatever language)? A new language created just by saying or thinking (one doesn't have to say it) the mixed sentence? And what about sentences with newly invented words? Sometimes we can invent a word and make perfect sense for people who listen to it for the first time. My point is that, after all, it seems that linguistic meaning isn't meaning according to a language. Or, if this is wrong, at least there is no "definite philosophical way" to say that something is one (rather than two or half) language, or that some sentence belongs to one language rather than to an arbitrary number of languages (made of arbitrary sums of other languages). Or so it seems to me... :-) (I love your site. It's terrible when you are on vacation, that's always when questions appear to me.)

Read another response by Gabriel Segal
Read another response about Language