I have a question about philosophy itself that I hope is not too general, for

I have a question about philosophy itself that I hope is not too general, for

I have a question about philosophy itself that I hope is not too general, for you (as I feel it's important). I have my B.A. from an accredited University and am still trying to figure out how a philosopher explains the processes of intuition. I consider myself to be a philosopher in my heart---a manner with which I analyze and view the world from all different angles (surely, a logical process). I also have a side of me that is intuitive (or, that sometimes goes completely against logic, yet ends up being extremely accurate). It would seem that intuition itself sometimes (or usually) expresses a certain accurate knowledge of the universe in a different manner than logic; yet can (for some more than others, depending on giftedness in this vein) be depended on for things that logic alone cannot provide. What is the purpose and reliability of intuition, from a professional philosopher's vantage point? Do you feel this concept is tied into religion and God, or strictly to the former life experiences and personality of the individual from whom the intuition comes? (i.e.: I am an "INFP" on the Meyers-Briggs personality inventory. Yet, I am highly "thinking" oriented and analyze everything to a maddening pulp, within my own lens of reality). Your perspective would be much appreciated. Thanks!

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